Home » Highway Inspectors Handbook by Prévost Hubbard
Highway Inspectors Handbook Prévost Hubbard

Highway Inspectors Handbook

Prévost Hubbard

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230732879
Paperback
98 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...371). A cubic footMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...371). A cubic foot measure for determining weight per cubic foot in case broken slag is used ( 375). A stout screw driver about 6 inches long. A thermometer ( 386). For Records and Reports: A field diary and pencil. A supply of report forms ( 404). A carbon paper for duplication of reports. 209. Maintenance. For maintenance the Inspectors equipment will ordinarily be the same as for surface treatment with carpeting mediums ( 191). If extensive patching is involved, however, he may in addition require certain items covered under construction ( 208). CHAPTER XI INSPECTION OF CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS AND PAVEMENTS GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS 210. Composition. Without descriptive prefix the term concrete is generally understood in this country to mean a mixture of Portland cement ( 65) with coarse and fine mineral aggregate and water. Coarse aggregate may consist of broken stone, broken slag, gravel or shell which will be retained on a J-inch screen. Fine aggregate may consist of sand, or screenings from any of the above-mentioned materials which will pass a j-inch screen. While Portland cement is almost invariably used as the bonding element for concrete road structures, natural cement ( 72) or Puzzolan cement ( 61) may be used to serve a similar purpose. 211. Proportioning. The strength and other resistant qualities of well-mixed and well-cured concrete depend not only upon the quality of the various constituents but upon the relative proportions in which they are present. In specifications these proportions are almost invariably stated upon a volume basis for cement, fine aggregate and coarse aggregate. Thus a 1: 2: 4 concrete is composed of one part by volume of cement, two parts by...