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Death Benefit Philip Harper

Death Benefit

Philip Harper

Published January 28th 2000
ISBN : 9781931755054
Paperback
232 pages
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 About the Book 

As if insurance agents dont have it bad enough, along comes Jim Hartman, a Frankensteins monster begat of sloth, greed, and Philip Harper (the pseudonym for investigative reporter Jonathan Neumann and Stuart Green, a psychologist specializing inMoreAs if insurance agents dont have it bad enough, along comes Jim Hartman, a Frankensteins monster begat of sloth, greed, and Philip Harper (the pseudonym for investigative reporter Jonathan Neumann and Stuart Green, a psychologist specializing in violent offenders). Not content with the usual game and gain, Hartmans hit upon a lucrative sideline: the murder-made-to-look-like-negligence of his clients children, followed by a wrongful death suit brought by a hand-picked attorney. Or, in Death Benefits central case, the untimely death of a young wife and mother and the more untimely reasons her policy wont pay. Unfortunately for Hartman, hes picked a friend of erstwhile investigative reporter and earthbound avenging angel, George Gray. But with all of that going for him, Hartman had made a mistake. His lies about Karens illness were too specific. The events in his phony file would have left a paper trail. If I could show the trail was missing, then I could prove that what he described had never actually taken place. Karen and Jerrys policy had ended eight years ago. That had to mean that Hartman had been keeping the premium payments since then. If I alerted the insurance company about the scam, the company wouldnt like the news but wouldnt do anything to pay Jerry what he was due. If I went to the police, Hartman might get arrested, but that wouldnt get Jerry the death benefit either. Hartman had cheated the family out of their money. I intended to see that he paid. Taut, sure, and finely written, Death Benefit, like Grays previous outings (Payback and Final Fear), is about simple justice. Wrongs are righted and innocents repaid, legally or otherwise, by the guilty parties. There are more than one, certainly, and sussing out (and resussing out) who they are (watch for the nicely drawn, beautiful, and brilliant lawyer, Rachel Curren), what they owe, and how theyll ultimately pay is worth the price of admission. --Michael Hudson